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Disposeable nappies

I cannot understand why women of this day and age want to use disposeable nappies. You can get some really beaut bright coloured cloth nappies that hug and cling just as well as a disposeable one. The only thing the cloth nappies DON'T DO is foul up the environment. There are so many of these foul smelling plastics nappies (half the time not even emptied) that do not break down and add more pollution to our soils and air.

The problem is people are lazy, it is convenient for them. These cost a fortune over a few years, imagine what they can save.Don't they realize that the Earth has a problem, don't they want to make it better for their children and so on.

Wake up please, think of your children.

Last reply: 21st Aug 2012 / 63 replies / Post by Son

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david

Posted by: david
Posted: 3rd May 2010

david says: a lot of people do not care about earths problems.they should be thinging ahead for there children and grand children.as for nappy disposables they are very expensive and some people,not all do not dispose of them properly,causing more damage to our enviroment.cloth nappies last for years and years,just put the baby poo straight into the toilet and soak your nappies then wash them.after saying this my daughter uses disposables but does get rid of them in the correct manner.david Reply

Son

Posted by: Son
Posted: 3rd May 2010

david says: a lot of people do not care about earths problems.they should be thinging ahead for there children and grand children.as for nappy disposables they are very expensive and some people,not all do not...

Son says: Yes David,

People live in a fantasy world I think, which is very sad indeed, I have taught my daughter to use cloth nappies, but my daughter in law wants to use disposeables, much to my horror, you can only suggest it to them and hope they listen. I raised twins and I never used those awful things. Not hard to empty, soak and wash a cloth nappy. Another thing is that when these mothers use disposeables they don't toilet train the child until much later, so you see these 2 and 3 year old children running around in disposeables. Sandra

Reply

david

Posted by: david
Posted: 3rd May 2010

Son says: Yes David,

People live in a fantasy world I think, which is very sad indeed, I have taught my daughter to use cloth nappies, but my daughter in law wants to use disposeables, much to my...

david says: son,i completely agree with you.your right we can only suggest thinks.at least we try and our conscious is clear.good for you for trying to change your daughter in-laws ways.but the final decision is hers right or wrong?david Reply

Son

Posted by: Son
Posted: 3rd May 2010

david says: son,i completely agree with you.your right we can only suggest thinks.at least we try and our conscious is clear.good for you for trying to change your daughter in-laws ways.but the final decision...

Son says: Thanks David,

I am so glad someone agrees with me, thank you. I Feel better for saying something, been bugging me for ages now. I hope more people will realize sooner than later.

Son Reply

Aimee

Posted by: Aimee
Posted: 7th Jun 2011

david says: son,i completely agree with you.your right we can only suggest thinks.at least we try and our conscious is clear.good for you for trying to change your daughter in-laws ways.but the final decision...

Aimee says: I am a grandmother and when I had my sone I used cotton nappies and disposable nappies and now that I am a grandmother I am doing the same again. I use the cotton at home and when I am out and about shopping I use the disposable ones, as you wont find me walking through the plaza with a smelly cotton diaper in my bag. Think about it!!!! Reply

ValmaL

Posted by: ValmaL
Posted: 20th Sep 2010

david says: a lot of people do not care about earths problems.they should be thinging ahead for there children and grand children.as for nappy disposables they are very expensive and some people,not all do not...

ValmaL says: We looked after our grandson 4 days a week as our daughterinlaw worked we has a set of our own cloth nappies and we said we would wash what he used here. I t worked well and they were very grateful. Reply

david

Posted by: david
Posted: 21st Sep 2010

ValmaL says: We looked after our grandson 4 days a week as our daughterinlaw worked we has a set of our own cloth nappies and we said we would wash what he used here. I t worked well and they were very...

david says: well done valmal,more people should think as you do Reply

sniperbabe

Posted by: sniperbabe
Posted: 14th May 2010

sniperbabe says: i don't eat nappies, sorry
but poo is good for soil Reply

david

Posted by: david
Posted: 21st Sep 2010

sniperbabe says: i don't eat nappies, sorry
but poo is good for soil

david says: what do you do with your nappies?? are they used for landfill Reply

shachah7

Posted by: shachah7
Posted: 24th May 2010

shachah7 says: non-disposbles take alot of water and electricity to clean. there is a tradeoff.

perhaps a biodegradeable nappy is best. Reply

Son

Posted by: Son
Posted: 24th May 2010

shachah7 says: non-disposbles take alot of water and electricity to clean. there is a tradeoff.

perhaps a biodegradeable nappy is best.

Son says: Hi scachah7.

Yes I do agree with you there and wouldn't it be wonderful if there was a biodegradeable nappy around that didn't take a long time to disintergrate. My little baby grandson had disaposeables on in hospital and within that first week had a nappy rash. Which is sad I think. More thought needs to be put into such a huge consumer product. Reply

spabath

Posted by: spabath
Posted: 13th Mar 2011

Son says: Hi scachah7.

Yes I do agree with you there and wouldn't it be wonderful if there was a biodegradeable nappy around that didn't take a long time to disintergrate. My little baby grandson...

spabath says: I agree with yout views Son. It is not difficult to wash cloth nappies. The dumping of dirty disposable nappies in public rubbish bins is obnoxious. Reply

david

Posted by: david
Posted: 21st Sep 2010

shachah7 says: non-disposbles take alot of water and electricity to clean. there is a tradeoff.

perhaps a biodegradeable nappy is best.

david says: there is no no trase off for the enviroment.use recycled water for nappy wash.then water the roses Reply

reen

Posted by: reen
Posted: 8th Feb 2011

shachah7 says: non-disposbles take alot of water and electricity to clean. there is a tradeoff.

perhaps a biodegradeable nappy is best.

reen says: Hmmmmm. Have almost toilet trained my third child. All my children have been raised in cloth nappies. I use maybe 7 litres of warm water and 1/4c nappy treatment every 2nd day. This is small comparison to disoables when we are talking about the environment Reply

Kiwi chick

Posted by: Kiwi chick
Posted: 8th Feb 2011

shachah7 says: non-disposbles take alot of water and electricity to clean. there is a tradeoff.

perhaps a biodegradeable nappy is best.

Kiwi chick says: Studies have shown that even with the washing etc that cloth nappies are better. My daughter is expecting her first child and has done the sums and has decided to go for the fitted nappies. You can reduce the impact of cloth nappies by rinsing the solids off the nappy and leaving to soak in cold water only and the use a hot wash with no detergent. I had to do this method with my 3rd child as he had very sensitive skin. Drying the nappies in the sun removes the worst of any stains. I also wonder about the effect of baby wipes and nappy liners. Do they biodegrade? I cut up into smaller pieces and hemmed a nappy (or you can use old flannels) and used them wet as baby wipes. Very effective and they went into the wash with the nappies. Reply

Ceci

Posted by: Ceci
Posted: 20th Apr 2011

shachah7 says: non-disposbles take alot of water and electricity to clean. there is a tradeoff.

perhaps a biodegradeable nappy is best.

Ceci says: There was a study to compare the impact to the environment when using nappies, and they couldn't come up with an answer. They are both equally bad and for the reasons that you mentioned. Reply

david

Posted by: david
Posted: 7th Jun 2011

shachah7 says: non-disposbles take alot of water and electricity to clean. there is a tradeoff.

perhaps a biodegradeable nappy is best.

david says: shachah7.using a little more water and electricity may not be good for our enviroment,long term.but it is certainly a lot better than putting plastic covered nappies into our dumps which will probably never break down.why dont you invent biodegradable nappies,you will make a million.when you do please remember i gave you that little nudge $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ Reply

Anonymous

Posted by: Anonymous
Posted: 16th Jun 2011

shachah7 says: non-disposbles take alot of water and electricity to clean. there is a tradeoff.

perhaps a biodegradeable nappy is best.

says: You are right. There has been lots of studies and the reality is cloth nappies are not enviro friendly.

Go seek out the studies and make an informed decision. I did this before the birth of my first child and was surprised to find out a biodegradable nappy was the best option. Reply

Hels

Posted by: Hels
Posted: 26th May 2010

Hels says: I have noticed that most of these comments are made by men. I wonder if they were the ones changing the nappies and doing the washing. I have two children and do 2-3 loads of washing daily. If we used cloth nappies this would be more like 4-5 loads. I would never be able to leave the house. You can buy biodegradable disposable nappies at most supermarkets(which you would know if you had looked) so hey, you can have the best of both worlds! Reply

lenglish

Posted by: lenglish
Posted: 13th Jun 2010

Hels says: I have noticed that most of these comments are made by men. I wonder if they were the ones changing the nappies and doing the washing. I have two children and do 2-3 loads of washing daily. If we...

lenglish says: Yes, but biodegradable when? These things do break down eventually, but after hundreds of years. The sheer volume in landfill is incredible. The breeding ground for disease is also incredible. And the dollar cost is incredible too, much more than the power, water and soap costs.

Speaking as a mother of three (two in nappies) washing nappies is not such a chore. Most people own some sort of automatic machine that does the work for them. Hanging out and bringing in from the line takes just a few minutes (even at night after work on the days I work outside of home).

Balance that little effort against the environmental costs of one use nappies, the cloth wins hands down!!

Reply

janie

Posted by: janie
Posted: 15th Jul 2010

lenglish says: Yes, but biodegradable when? These things do break down eventually, but after hundreds of years. The sheer volume in landfill is incredible. The breeding ground for disease is also incredible. ...

janie says: Where do you all get your information and statistics from? Do you all work for Choice? Have you read the studies Choice have done on disposables versus cloth nappies. Perhaps some knowledge would assist with some of the outrageous claims being made in this forum. I am all for saving the environment, but I certainly don't think the answer is posting information that is blatantly incorrect. That's better known as scaremongering. Reply

lenglish

Posted by: lenglish
Posted: 16th Jul 2010

janie says: Where do you all get your information and statistics from? Do you all work for Choice? Have you read the studies Choice have done on disposables versus cloth nappies. Perhaps some knowledge...

lenglish says: Your statistics please - rather than personal attacks on other contibutors. It would make for a much more balanced discussion. Reply

StudyBug

Posted by: StudyBug
Posted: 4th Aug 2010

Hels says: I have noticed that most of these comments are made by men. I wonder if they were the ones changing the nappies and doing the washing. I have two children and do 2-3 loads of washing daily. If we...

StudyBug says: I agree Hels, are these people involved in the washing of the nappies or even changing them? Disposables are way more convenient - I use both - before you jump down my throat! The washables to require more effort. As for 'toilet training' - a child will use the toilet when they are ready, pushing them to do so is not the answer. Reply

bakie

Posted by: bakie
Posted: 17th Feb 2012

StudyBug says: I agree Hels, are these people involved in the washing of the nappies or even changing them? Disposables are way more convenient - I use both - before you jump down my throat! The washables to...

bakie says: I agree with both Hels and studybug. Disposable nappies are ALOT more convienant. Myself and my partner are on a very tight budget and disposables work out to be more affordable, possibly not in the long run but a pack of 44 for $15 why not! My mother used cloth nappies on myself and my older brothers. She has mentioned that disposables are so much better than cloth nappies, less nappy rash and don't have to change the nappy as often as you do with the cloth. Also I would say its a personal choice of the mother who is changing the diaper. If you want to use cloth then awesome if you dont then thats fine too! Reply

david

Posted by: david
Posted: 21st Sep 2010

Hels says: I have noticed that most of these comments are made by men. I wonder if they were the ones changing the nappies and doing the washing. I have two children and do 2-3 loads of washing daily. If we...

david says: disposible that are biodefadle are more expensive than normal dispossibles so the young tend to buy the cheaper brand,biodegradable nappies,exacty how long does it take for these nappies to be destroyed.doing small loads of washing nappies 2 a day.stop machine at the end of each cycle draining the water for garden use.men have every reason to comment as when i was born men used to change nappies as well as mum.you saying it is time sonsuming is crapp.wash the nappies while they are being done do the ironing.you people expect to have a great social life as wll having children.even today .home must come before sociability.i thing you are probably lazy Reply

mermaid

Posted by: mermaid
Posted: 19th Jul 2010

mermaid says: Like all products and services in our evoling world, marketing is the key to sales techniques like it or not the discussion of disposable vs cloth ends when the price and task at hand at persuaded by advertising.

I believe I do not need statistics to prove cloth nappies outwey the health of the child or environment for that matter. As a mom of 2 teens and a 3 year old am happy to have endured many hours disposing of their bodily givings and washing their cloth nappies.

We live in a throw away society hopefully the next generation will rise to the occasion and produce biodegradable products that serve customers and the earth! Reply

Mmm...coffee

Posted by: Mmm...coffee
Posted: 1st Aug 2010

Mmm...coffee says: Using a nappy wash service could be an option?? Reply

Mmm...coffee

Posted by: Mmm...coffee
Posted: 1st Aug 2010

Mmm...coffee says: Using a nappy wash service could be an option?? Reply

Mmm...coffee

Posted by: Mmm...coffee
Posted: 1st Aug 2010

Mmm...coffee says: Using a nappy wash service could be an option??

Mmm...coffee says: Oops...posted twice as I didn't think it worked the 1st time. I didn't see that there were 2 pages of replies :) Reply

Nina

Posted by: Nina
Posted: 11th Aug 2010

Nina says: What about the environment issues relating to using the washing machine and detergent and power..
There seems to be positive and negatives for both sides of the story - there usually is..

There are times when either/or would be applicable. Don't be narrow minded about just one aspect.. Reply

Candi04

Posted by: Candi04
Posted: 11th Aug 2010

Candi04 says: I think that both types of nappies have a place in modern society. I used cloth nappies with my daughter through the day, but used disposables at night and when we were out. Cloth nappies do use a lot of water which is a concern when you do not have town water. Cloth nappies are dreadful at night as they leak and who wants a wet baby waking every hour or 2? I agree that the environmental impact is phenomenal with disposables, so you can only do your best to lessen land fill. I do wonder however if the people on the forum who are up in arms about the environmental impact try to limit other areas of concern in their lives like driving a car, recycling, using natural products etc etc! Reply

blondie72

Posted by: blondie72
Posted: 21st Aug 2010

blondie72 says: I can't understand why this is in the food & drink thread? Not a very appetising topic?

Anyhow, in answer to the topic I believe it is usually one of two reason:
1. Allergic reaction to cloth nappy & washing powders etc
2. Laziness

Take you pick :)
Reply

david

Posted by: david
Posted: 21st Sep 2010

david says: these people do not care about the enviroment of the future.sad to say they do not care about the degeneration of our planet.nor do they care what happens to their children and grandchildren.i sometimes wonder if these people pertain to a certain age group.women with no husbands having 4-5 children with different partners.get a enoumous amount of money in government subsidies.get into me you people who dissagree with mebut go down to any big shopping centre these people hang out in groups looking very well dressed.obviuosly clothes bought throught these subsidies.woman who have children by accident a once of are excluded from my comments.the others i consider trailer trash.very harsh words Reply

david

Posted by: david
Posted: 22nd Sep 2010

david says: i know the earth has a problem.that is why people like you and i are trying to influence the community even the world about these ideas.i guess you cannot completely blame the consumer.the companies making money would be very pleased with these buyers.big companies could not give a stuff about our earth,as long as the money keeps rolling. Reply

PukPuk

Posted by: PukPuk
Posted: 26th Oct 2010

PukPuk says: Seems keeping the washing machine free of dirty nappies is a major factor. Solution is easy. Get on eBay and pick up a cheap one as a second machine just for the little gifts given freely several times a day by the little gifts of nature. Reply

ali

Posted by: ali
Posted: 5th Nov 2010

ali says: I used cloth nappies for all 3 of my children and was very happy with them.
And for years after they were out of nappies they became fantastic cleaning cloths - I was very sad when they ran out. They never had nappy rash and I didn't find it hard to clean them and hang out to dry in the lovely sunlight. I personally think it is a waste of money that could be better spent on other things instead of disposable nappies and the packaging they come in. And I really hated it when we had people over who had kids and they put their dirty nappies into my rubbish bin. Yuk. Maybe disposable nappies is just another "easy" alternative that seems to be the way the world if going - like frozen vegies and dinners (and canned baby food) and takeaways and throwing away clothes that get a tear instead of fixing it up and keep wearing. Everyone has to find their own preferred way of doing things - and I was happy with mine. Reply

Flick

Posted by: Flick
Posted: 10th Nov 2010

Flick says: Some of the comments on this forum reflect the simplistic view taken by many when it comes to the "children" debate. So often I read that people with children are lazy bogans who use government subsidies to feed their desire to purchase consumer goods and take their pesky children on planes just to spite the childless fellow passengers. Having recently become a parent and now living off a single income, and watching my friends struggle with the same, I can see these generalisations, which I may have been guilty of subscribing to myself some years ago, as being grossly untrue and unfair.

Back to the actual topic, I agree, people want convenience. That is what humankind strives towards. It is convenient for me to buy flour in a packet rather than grow and grind my own wheat, and to buy milk in a container rather than raise dairy cows. I think people need to look at their own conveniences that have environmental impacts before so harshly judging the users of disposable nappies. Reply

Anonymous

Posted by: Anonymous
Posted: 17th Nov 2010

says: 100% agree. In my day there wasn't such a thing. There is nothing like to smell and the feel of freshly washed nappies.. I say ban the disposeable nappies and bring back the fresh diapers.... Reply

mummy2jj

Posted by: mummy2jj
Posted: 23rd Nov 2010

mummy2jj says: i personally use modern cloth nappies that are bamboo. what a lot of people do not realise is that when disposables are being made they use a lot of water in the process a lot more than what we use for washing cloth nappies! Reply

moz

Posted by: moz
Posted: 30th Nov 2010

moz says: I couldn't have relied any better,good on you Reply

Anonymous

Posted by: Anonymous
Posted: 13th Dec 2010

says: I'm sorry to tell you but I wasnt lazy, I used them as long as possible. My sons legs were so chubby that the biggest sized pilchers i could get (Size 2) would not fit him and would cut the curculation off in his legs. It also became a problem when I had 1 still in nappies and 1 just born in nappies. I had back surgery and rinsing soaking and washing 2 lots of nappies, was just not an option for me. Sorry but people need to weigh up all the factors and decide for themselves, and not be judged by others. I find that most people that say that normally dont have children or only 1 or fairly spaced appart. Reply

wendymick

Posted by: wendymick
Posted: 18th Dec 2010

wendymick says: I agree to. Now adays it is easier to use the disposables because they just use them and throw them away.I hate it when people who come to my house then throw them in my bin.The nappy is not emptyed out before they throw them out then put in the bin.Then my bin stinks.
I dont know how people can afford them.They arent cheap.
Nothing looks better than a clothesline full of white nappies! Reply

stretch

Posted by: stretch
Posted: 13th Jan 2011

stretch says: most people that use disposable nappies are employed as the unemployed ones can not afforf them
what we could do is chase up the tax man and point out he could make a fortune if he increased the tax leval for the undisposable items that make companies out to be liers
you are truthful that at least half of them dont break down
you could always find the users and burry them in the back yard for a laugh and point out they are still there in 12 months full of goo Reply

reen

Posted by: reen
Posted: 8th Feb 2011

reen says: totally agree. put all 3 of my children through modern cloth nappies (the dome up fitted ones with insert) and loved them. Actually very little work jus something that had to be done. Every 2nd day for me Reply

Crys

Posted by: Crys
Posted: 11th Feb 2011

Crys says: Why does it just say women of this day and age? Do men not change their own children's nappies??? Maybe the men should have a go at changing and washing the nappies and see how they like it. I'm not saying that disposable nappies are the way to go - obviously they are bad for the environment but with so many people working such long hours, I don't think it is "lazy" to use a disposable nappy. The last thing you want to do when you have been at work is wash a pile of dirty nappies. Reply

paradox

Posted by: paradox
Posted: 21st Oct 2011

Crys says: Why does it just say women of this day and age? Do men not change their own children's nappies??? Maybe the men should have a go at changing and washing the nappies and see how they like it. I'm...

paradox says: Hi Crys, I'm a bloke, I done nappies for three babies, it's a shit (no pun intended) job. Can't say I wouldn't have used disposables if they would have been around. All I can say is that my girl and I worked together and one of us stayed home to look after the kids. We didn't have anywhere to send the babies and toddlers to. We wanted kids and copped the consequences. not a big deal, millions do it all the time. As for saving the planet, I'm all for it, its the only one we've got!!!!
Crys, this is not meant as a criticism, just telling it as it is or rather as it was. Reply

spabath

Posted by: spabath
Posted: 13th Mar 2011

spabath says: I agree completely with all you have said, Son. One of the most obnoxious habits is the placing of dirty, smelly disposable nappies in public bins. Reply

tarns

Posted by: tarns
Posted: 1st Apr 2011

tarns says: I use disposable nappies and have done for my two children this is my right to do this i am not a lazy person at all. yes i do use them because it is convenient for me to do so. does this make me a bad mother for doing this? i don't think so! there is a lot worse thing people do to their kids
yes this earth has alot of problems and we do our best as a family to make it right in fact my partner and i own our own foresty business and we plant tree's for six months of the year we have 10 staff who help plant tree's we plant up to 1600 tree's a day this is helping you and your family to live and breath. we all make our mistakes in this life and we all have our own ways that we help and you have the right to complain and judge and have your say on what people like me are doing is wrong. But i bet if i was to go through your house I would find alot of thing that you do to harm this enviroment. Reply

nag

Posted by: nag
Posted: 20th Apr 2011

nag says: yes, quiet agree with u. but it is not that people r lazy but it is individual attitude as u know differs one to another. but other statements what u have made is true. good. Reply

Qsita

Posted by: Qsita
Posted: 16th May 2011

Qsita says: I just want to know if any of us ladies uses cloth feminine pads and washes them at home... no? So you use disposable feminine pads/tampons.... why? You don't care about the environment?
I really wish there were environmetally friendly disposable nappies. But I still don't regret having used disposable nappies, sorry. Reply

Qsita

Posted by: Qsita
Posted: 16th May 2011

Qsita says: I just want to know if any of us ladies uses cloth feminine pads and washes them at home... no? So you use disposable feminine pads/tampons.... why? You don't care about the environment?
I...

Qsita says: Error correction: I wanted to say "I really wish there were environmentally friendly disposable nappies when I had my son..." Reply

Isildae

Posted by: Isildae
Posted: 31st May 2012

Qsita says: I just want to know if any of us ladies uses cloth feminine pads and washes them at home... no? So you use disposable feminine pads/tampons.... why? You don't care about the environment?
I...

Isildae says: Thank you Qsita for bringing up the disposable feminine products argument. I use cloth feminine pads for environmental and financial reasons. But when it comes to time-saving, washing a few pads once a month is a big difference to washing a few nappies every day. Reply

Anonymous

Posted by: Anonymous
Posted: 16th May 2011

says: I would like to add its not that woman are lazy but have you tried flushing poo from a nappy when a baby has diahorea or has mushed it right through there is no hope and not to mention we live in a drought afftected area so water is precious so washing nappies so often would affect the environment just as much Reply

isaacsmum

Posted by: isaacsmum
Posted: 2nd Jul 2011

isaacsmum says: We use cloth nappies - they are not difficult at all and apart from the obvious advantages of not negatively impacting the environment, they are super cute! It does not use as much water and power as people might think. I might put on one extra wash per week and thats mainly because it's not wise to wash the nappies with sheets or towels otherwise the nappies wont get cleaned thoroughly enough. We do also use biodegradeable nappies as well. It is really important to teach our children to have an environmental conscience, and to do this properly you need to lead by example as a parent. My husband was sceptical at first of cloth nappying but he too can that it is the best for our baby and the planet and he can change the nappy just as well as I can. I would really love to see the government (local or state) to start encouraging parents to try cloth. In NZ, some councils are right behind it and give parents incentives to give it a go by offering a rebate of the start-up cost. Im gald we're able to our little bit to be kinder to the environment :) Reply

Ceci

Posted by: Ceci
Posted: 2nd Sep 2011

Ceci says: I agree with Aimee!!!!!
And let me add to this, that there was test conducted in USA about this and the environmental impact of the disposeable nappies compare to the contamination of water and energy consumed in washing those cloth nappies is the same. So when talking about environment we all should be extremely well informed before acting. By the way, do you leave your TV or any other devices on stand by? Do you know how much that costs to the environment. What do you do besides recycling to help the environment? Reply

kreative

Posted by: kreative
Posted: 27th Dec 2011

kreative says: My children are grown now but I had to use both. My eldest got cloth, his sister (1 yr later) got disposables. It wasn't because they were cheap or convenient, it was because the minute I put cloth on her, she would get a severe reaction - so much so that she would bleed. I changes all manner of detergents and soakers and all and nothing worked until I used disposables. I know many that have the reverse problem.

I now work in childcare where the nappies are provided. They are disposables. I think they are biodegradable. I will ask the boss as she wants to cut down on carbon print next year so she will probably be open to this. I don't think it would be practical to use cloth and wash in our environment but it would be nice. Reply

smiles

Posted by: smiles
Posted: 29th Dec 2011

smiles says: I agree very much it is time we see the cloth nappies being used again it is disgusting how the people of the day, do not think of the future and reak the enviroment. Most do not even empty the contents in the toilet. I do know. That there is enviroment friendly nappies but no the old cloth nappies yes. In summer when nice days the youngsters can run around with out any on and air their bums. then if they do decide to do number 2s you can use a spade and dispose of it. Reply

verity

Posted by: verity
Posted: 4th Jan 2012

verity says: Try having twins and cloth nappies all the time. I used both, but was thankful for disposeable, specially when out. Reply

Lami

Posted by: Lami
Posted: 20th Feb 2012

Lami says: I use Little Takas disposable nappies.
They are biodegradable and better than the other disposables.
They also don't smell!! I have recently switched from Huggies which did smell to Little Takas and was very surprised!

I ask the people using cloth nappies... What are you doing to our environment by using all that washing powder and soaking solution as you wash them and the suds go into out water system?
Reply

jen

Posted by: jen
Posted: 24th Feb 2012

jen says: cloth nappies cause rashes and dont give me all the guff about do this do that - for my kids it didnt work but disposables solved the problem. Its got nothing to do with being lazy. And when i did use cloth i had tons of strong sterilizers going down the drain mmm wonder what that does to the environment. Bet you dont have kids.. Reply

Isildae

Posted by: Isildae
Posted: 31st May 2012

Isildae says: I use a mixture of cloth and disposable nappies but not because I'm lazy. I have 4 children and work - disposable nappies are more convenient. There are other things I do to reduce our carbon footprint - I don't have a dryer, I grow my own fruit and veggies, bake my own bread and buy local produce whereever possible, thus reducing the pollution involved in transporting good. I telecommute and my children catch the bus from school, reducing traffic congesion and pollution. I have a compost heap, a water tank, solar panel system and a worm farm. I don't drink, take drugs or smoke. I recycle, I avoid buying products with excessive packaging. I don't take overseas holidays (air pollution) and instead aim for eco-friendly destinations. I am thinking of my children and teach them about sustainability and our responsibility to the environment.

Many child care centres won't change cloth nappies or charge extra for this service. Some people who use cloth nappies tumble dry them, thus negating whatever environmental savings they make by using electricity. Disposable nappies are more than just a convenience for women who have had a difficult birth and are less physically mobile (c-sec, broken pelvis) or have a general disability and do not have the sort of practical family support mothers did two generations ago. Disposable nappies are your particular bugbear but unless you are also doing all the things I am doing then I don't think you are in a position to preach that users of disposable nappies are lazy or not aware of the costs, both financial and environmental. I don't appreciate being made to feel inferior because I use a product for convenience. 100% of Australian households outsource some domestic service - usually the purchase of prepackaged foods. Have you considered the environmental impact of all that landfill? Disposable nappies are just one of thousands of 'convenience' products that are damaging our environment - we are all busy and stressed these days and nobody needs the additional guilt of the disposable / cloth nappy argument. Mothers arguing about stay at home vs working, breast vs formula, cloth vs disposable achieves nothing and only adds to the current epidemic of post-natal depression. Reply

tashlz

Posted by: tashlz
Posted: 14th Aug 2012

tashlz says: I agree with halz. Most men dont do the changing or washing it takes alot of time and not mention the price if electricity and water at the moment. Cloth nappies are very expensive there is no way alot of parents could afford them as well as formula, food, clothes etc. But i do agree that alot of people need to learn how to discard them in a correct way. Reply

Amandaa

Posted by: Amandaa
Posted: 21st Aug 2012

Amandaa says: I tried using cloth nappies the problem is that the PVC pants dont always contain the contents. I often picked my child up from a sleep and he and the bed were wet. they also dont keep the baby dry so my child was never sleeping for long which lead to a very cranky baby. I would go through at least 3 - 4 changes of clothes a day due to wet clothes also finding pvc pants in a oooo is very hard. If this did not happen i would be happy to continue using cloth nappies as doing extra washing is not an issue but but having a cranky baby is. Reply

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