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War on waste

Following ABC's recent "War on Waste" television series, we wanted to know more about what everyday people do to reduce the amount of waste their households produce. We asked you what you thought, how easy it is to do, and what difference you feel you are making.


The program certainly had an impact, and uncovered some strong feelings about recycling and waste reduction. Clearly it tapped into an issue that for many is extremely important.

“Oooooooh.........I love this Topic and have been waiting for a hearty Discussion in which I can contribute and voice My opinion......!!!!"

For most, reducing waste is an everyday routine. Whether it's making good use of council recycling bins, taking re-usable bags to the supermarket, or using a worm-farm to dispose of food scraps, minimising waste is already well-ingrained in many people's households.


“I recycle everything I can. I buy clothes from op shops & donate my old ones. I renovate furniture, don't buy new things. & have things repaired, not thrown out to buy new ones"

However it's not always an easy thing to do. With time pressures and confusion about what can and can't be recycled, good intentions do not always translate into action. Doing the right thing takes organisation and dedication.


"I was very pro-active changing things around in my recycling habits but soon fell back into my old ways."


"I believe it is a matter of commitment. Once the mind is made up, then it is simply a matter of organisation & then sticking to a routine."

The biggest issue when it comes to reducing waste is that while people are doing what they can, the biggest contributors – large companies – are not pulling their weight. Through excess packaging, disposal of excess food, or other wasteful business practices, corporate Australia is seen to be ignoring the war on waste.


"Why does it always have to go back to the individual to try and make a difference, when it is really the fault of the manufacturers. They choose the cheapest packaging and always supply small packs of everything nothing in bulk."

"As usual is it is the big players; governments, big business, supermarket giants, fast food chains, etc, who make a massive impact and create a huge amount of waste but whose only concern is the bottom line who need to take more action, or be forced to take more action."


So it seems that Australians are already fighting this war and they want companies to join them in the battle, but they aren't listening. The question that we should be asking corporate Australia is this: what are you doing to join your customers in fighting the war on waste?

Last reply: 4th Dec 2018 / 24 replies / Post by Cafestudy Admin

Reply

joolsc7

Posted by: joolsc7
Posted on: 4th May 2018

joolsc7 says: I am extremely shocked by the amount of rubbish that Australians throw away. I have always recycled and reused everything I possibly could, grown a lot of my own fruit and vegetables and composted my food waste. I have also used my own shopping bags for many years and usually only have one small bag of rubbish to put in my bin each week. I do not buy bottled water or coffee in disposable cups.
Bring back the Bulk stores we had years ago where we could bring along our own containers and refill them with the basic food items we all use: no wasteful packaging to be disposed of.
If we want future generations to live in a clean and healthy environment, we all need to do whatever we can to achieve this and stop blaming others for the problem, whether it be lobbying the Government to put pressure on big companies to reduce the waste or simply being more aware of our own bad habits and what changes we can make.

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